Being Your Best You: Hub Culture's 10th Anniversary London Salon

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4th Feb 2013

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Hub Culture's 10th anniversary is underway with a series of salon dinners hosted by friends and long-time members. Following a great kickoff in Davos, the series came to London with a simple question in mind: how do we be our best self?

The London event gathered 14 guests at the Modern Pantry, a chic east London eatery, for an evening of convivial conversation and strategic introductions.

A mix of fashionistas (Veronica Moncho Lobo and Harrys of London) joined fund managers, artists, a fitness trainer and others for an evening to remember ten years of Hub Culture antics around the world, and to talk about how we can maximize the coming years to enhance 'our best self'.

The conversation drifted toward the softer side of relationships, and their value in a world that is increasingly quant driven.  Both time and experience make the relationship, and the fondness that comes with familiarity was described as a value without limit.

As social media driven metrics that measure more aspecdts of life take hold among the digitally enabled, the concept of "quantified self" - tracking and measuring our performance, fitness, and intake, looks set to move from the sidelines into the forefront of how we view ourselves.  

When everything we do becomes measured, the pressure to be better, look better, and feel better becomes more defined, more comparable, and perhaps more actionable.

Such public metrics are already changing the way groups interact, and as certain groups age or mature, it adds another layer of value judgement. From worries about maintaining vitality to concerns about how well we age, the message was clear: our best selves are a moving target!

The topic of the evening fit well with Oxylent, an advocate of self improvement through all natural vitamin supplements founded by dinner host Lisa Lent, who founded the company after searching for better supplements as a frequent international traveler.  Magic little powders mix with water to form an effervescent health drink.  

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But after the cork popped on the third bottle of wine, the group fell into a less critical tone - and the value of real relationships in supporting social and mental health took over.  Everyone agreed that life is for living, not just for monitoring, and we might be happiest when the quantifiers are turned off and we can just enjoy the evening.  

Such was this salon - where the grand conversation and theory was soon abandonded for good old fashioned cocktail conversation - living in the moment, not for the future. Such presence is not a bad thing to focus on as Hub Culture looks toward the next ten years.